Rolling Hills Newsletter: Is Rolling Hills one of the Few Dark Cities Left?


Have you ever wondered why there are not any street lights in Rolling Hills?

In a world where people spend most of their time looking down upon screens, there is not much incentive to look up, when cities block out the night sky.

Rolling Hills does not have streetlights, because streetlights would disrupt the natural beauty of the city. Many people are not lucky enough to say that they live in one of the few neighborhoods left that do not have street lights and light pollution obstructing the night skies. Although neighboring cities light pollution may lessen the starry night’s visibility in Rolling Hills, by keeping the “no streetlights” rule alive, residents are given a much clearer vision of the starry night then their neighbors.

While watching Barry Peterson in 60 Minutes, “Preserving the Starry, Starry Night”, he reports the importance of preserving the starry night, and the consequences of light pollutions obstruction of the night sky.

And it turns out; darkness is something you can sell. Homes are being built specifically for people who want to live under the dark sky. To help preserve their heavenly views, developments bans streetlights and even outdoor lights. The episode discusses how the moon is just the beginning of exploration, and there is still plenty to learn about the universe from gazing at a truly dark night sky. Much about the universe still remains a mystery and it is up to our children and descendents to unlock this undiscovered knowledge. By keeping light pollution away, our descendents may look up at the beautiful night sky and it may spark the interest and the curiosity to know more, which could lead to the opportunity to discover the mysteries of the universe.

Although Rolling Hills may not be a completely clear sky, free of light pollution, it may be one of the last cities where the modern man can look up and see a bit of what our ancient ancestors saw, trembling, delighting, or just basking in nature’s nightlight.

Peterson, Barry. “Preserving the Starry, Starry Night.” CBSNews. CBS Interactive, 10 Aug. 2014. Web.

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Top 1,000 Real Estate professional Teams BY
Real Trends, As advertised IN The Wall Street Journal

The Inman Team, Rolling Hills, Had an Impressive 1.7 Million Dollars in Average Sales Price on Their Way to Becoming One of the Palos Verdes Peninsulas Top Professionals  


Rolling Hills, CA, June 29, 2015 The Inman Team of Keller Williams Realty was named one of America’s top real estate professional teams by REAL Trends, as advertised in The Wall Street Journal.  The Inman Team is now a member of the “The Thousand Top Real Estate Professionals,” a prestigious national awards ranking sponsored annually by the two respected publications. The Inman Team is now ranked in the top one half of 1 percent of the more than 1,100,000 REALTORS® nationwide.

The Thousand real estate professionals was announced on June 26, 2015, with four separate categories honoring the top 250 residential agents and agent teams for excellence.

“The best individual agents and teams—including The Inman Teams award-winning efforts—were nothing short of phenomenal considering the recovering real estate market,” said Steve Murray, founder of Denver-based publishing and communications company REAL Trends, which compiled the list.


Page Two – The Thousand Press Release

“Becoming a member of such an elite group as The Thousand is an incredible accomplishment in any market, but what The Inman Team did during these challenging times is impressive on so many levels,” said Marti Gallardo, vice president of classified advertising for The Wall Street Journal.  “Their efforts topped 99.99 percent of the more than 1,100,000 REALTORS nationwide.”

“I am absolutely thrilled to be named to The Thousand,” said Gordon Inman who serves clients primarily in the Palos Verdes Peninsula. “Even with the market’s challenges, it’s incredibly gratifying to help clients find their dream homes as well as help them sell their properties quickly and for the highest price possible.”

The ranking of The Thousand can be found at:

About The Thousand – This awards program was developed jointly by WSJ. Custom Studios (and is not affiliated with the Editorial Department) and REAL Trends, a leading source of analysis and information for the residential real estate brokerage industry. REAL Trends The Thousand honors America’s elite real estate agents and their companies and is compiled and analyzed by REAL Trends with a special ad section included in The Wall

Rolling Hills The Early Years: June

The Early Years – Sheriffs Posse, Los Angeles County


In the early days of Los Angeles, the Sheriff had a group of men he could call upon him to help him in capturing highwaymen, murderers, and desperados. The men of the posse were all mounted because the bandits would escape to the outlying country and had to be caught by men on horseback.

By 1940, the Sheriff’s Posse was primarily a social organization. It was composed of a group of expert horsemen – you’ve seen them ride many times in the Tournament of Roses Parade.

The Sheriffs Posse probably reached the height of its prestige in 1930-1940 under Sheriff Eugene W. Biscaluiz. It was a large group of men, and occasionally they would go to some of the large ranchos around Southern California for rides. All of it was for fun – they would trailer their horses to the rancho headquarters that they were going to, and saddle up their favorite horse with a western work saddle, equipped with lariat, etc., and go off for a ride of miles and miles, and end up having a barbecue and then going home.

Just after the hay was harvested, in the late summer of 1940, the Palos Verdes Corporation invited the Sheriff’s Posse to come to Rolling Hills and ride over our 12,000 acres, and be the guests of the Palos Verdes Corporation, and enjoy themselves.

They all assembled at Ken Buggy’s Rolling Hills Riding Stables, unloaded their horses and saddled up with western saddles and equipment. From the assembly point, they rode across fields until they came to Rancho Elastico. It was a beautiful, clear, sparkling Autumn day – and dry. So, by the time they got to my ranchito they were all ready for a drink.

I had arranged to have a bar set up on a pickup truck. It was all equipped with liquid refreshments that a Sheriff’s Posse would like. After a round of drinks, the children’s ringtail monkey, who was a great household pet and who really ruled the roost, showed up. He had been in the habit, when we had guests, of stealing a sip from the Old Fashioned glasses – and here was his golden opportunity.

The riders thought it was funny as heck that a monkey would like liquor. After a drink or two, Adolph, which the children thought was a fine name for a monkey, climbed to the top of the tallest eucalyptus and then would leap high in the air to the neighboring black acacia tree – but he rapidly got to the point where, on account of being a little the worse for liquor, he would miss the upper limbs of the tree and come tumbling down and just barely catch himself. He did this over and over. That monkey really had a head by the time the Posse rode on to the next stop.

From Rancho Elastico the Posse rode down the Long Valley until they came to a stack of straw. This year we had threshed the barley rather than baling it, and where the Peninsula Center is at the present time was a huge stack of fluffy, loose, barley straw. They were all feeling pretty good – it was a nice, warm day. They got to riding around and around and around the stack of straw. Then every once in awhile, one of the riders would get very hilarious and he would his horse straight into the straw, which was very loose, and the horse would stumble and fall down, and the rider would fall off – and the only way the could get the rider and horse back onto firm ground again would be to lasso them and drag them out. And that is one version of what you might call “horsing around”

By 1:00 pm everybody was starving, and ready for a good meal, and they had a good meal. We had employed caterers to barbecue the food. They barbecued a steer, and it was ready by the time the boys got there. There were all kinds of Mexican dishes – lots of frijoles, tamales, and green salad — anything they wanted. There was plenty of beer, plenty of coffee, and plenty of fun.

From there the Posse rode down Georgeff Canyon back to the Rolling Hills Riding Stables, where they unsaddled, put their horses in the trailers, and returned to their homes.

Excerpt from: Rolling Hills: The Early Years by A.E. Hanson